Run Powershell scheduled task without pop up

I found this solution a while back by calling the PowerShell Script via a .VBS script. Not ideal but, it negates the window flash:

command = "powershell.exe -nologo -command C:\Scripts\YourScript.ps1"  
set shell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
shell.Run command,0

Schedule this .VBS in the task scheduler and it will call your script the same as before.

How do you turn around the culture of a 130,000-person company? Ask Satya Nadella

It was March 27, 2014, and Satya Nadella was about to make his first public appearance as CEO of Microsoft. The tone, he knew, would be important.

Nadella’s predecessor, Steve Ballmer, was famous for making public appearances feel epic. At a 1991 meeting in Japan, he seemed to injure his vocal chords because he was screaming “Windows” with such force. In 2000, when Microsoft celebrated its 25th anniversary, Ballmer reportedly popped out of a giant cake. And in 2013, when he announced he was stepping down, he bid farewell to 13,000 Microsoft employees as “(I’ve had) The Time of My Life” blared through the speakers of Key Arena in Seattle. Through tears, the 6’5” Ballmer shouted, “Soak it in all of you. You work for the greatest company in the world.”

Nadella was not that kind of CEO.

Continue reading “How do you turn around the culture of a 130,000-person company? Ask Satya Nadella”

“The Linux of social media”—How LiveJournal pioneered (then lost) blogging

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/the-linux-of-social-media-how-livejournal-pioneered-then-lost-web-blogging/?utm_source=wanqu.co&utm_campaign=Wanqu+Daily&utm_medium=website

George RR Martin’s platform switch reminds us of an early blogging giant greatly changed.

Last April, famed writer and hero-murderer George R.R. Martin announced that he was hoisting his ancient blog from his moldering LiveJournal onto his personal website. For casual Game of Thrones fans, it was a minor hiccup at best—most clicked the new link and never looked back. For a certain strata of enthusiasts, however, this was a far more momentous move. Described as “the last holdout” by longtime LiveJournal volunteer-turned-employee Janine Costanzo, Martin’s blog was perhaps the once-blogging-giant’s last bond to the world of great pop culture. So while the author may never finish his most beloved literary series, his simple act of Web hosting logistics truly marks the end of an era.

Continue reading ““The Linux of social media”—How LiveJournal pioneered (then lost) blogging”

First Kaggle Competition Experience

https://hackernoon.com/first-kaggle-competition-experience-591fbbc751a0

A write-up of my first kaggle competition experience

During my Initial planning on My Self-Taught Machine Learning journey this year, I had pledged to make into Top 25% for any 2 (Live) Kaggle competitions.

This is a write up of how Team “rm-rf /” made it to the Top 30% in our First kaggle competition ever: The “Quick, Draw! Doodle Recognition Challenge” by Google AI Team, hosted on kaggle.

Special Mention: Team “rm-rf /” was a two-member team consisting of my Business partner and friend Rishi Bhalodia and myself.

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Time Complexity of building a Suffix Tree

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7451942/time-complexity-of-building-a-suffix-tree

Your intuition behind why the algorithm should be Θ(n2) is a good one, but most suffix trees are designed in a way that eliminates the need for this time complexity. Intuitively, it would seem that you need Θ(n2) different nodes to hold all of the different suffixes, because you’d need n + (n – 1) + … + 1 different nodes. However, suffix trees are typically designed so that there isn’t a single node per character in the suffix. Instead, each edge is typically labeled with a sequence of characters that are substrings of the original string. It still may seem that you’d need Θ(n2) time to construct this tree because you’d have to copy the substrings over to these edges, but typically this is avoided by a cute trick – since all the edges are labeled with strings that are substrings of the input, the edges can instead be labeled with a start and end position, meaning that an edge spanning Θ(n) characters can be constructed in O(1) time and using O(1) space.

That said, constructing suffix trees is still really hard to do. The Θ(n) algorithms referenced in Wikipedia aren’t easy. One of the first algorithms found to work in linear time is Ukkonen’s Algorithm, which is commonly described in textbooks on string algorithms (such as Algorithms on Strings, Trees, and Sequences). The original paper is linked in Wikipedia. More modern approaches work by first building a suffix array and using that to then construct the suffix tree.

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-1/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-2/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-3/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-4/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-5/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-6/

http://wuyuansheng.brinkster.net/doc/Suffix-Trees.pdf

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9452701/ukkonens-suffix-tree-algorithm-in-plain-english/9513423#9513423

Why you can’t manage humans like they’re software

Source: https://qz.com/work/1493875/why-you-cant-manage-humans-like-theyre-software/

Early on at Amazon, CEO Jeff Bezos famously issued a memo about how software was to be built at the company. Teams would share their data through service interfaces, or APIs, the same way that they would share it with an outside customer. That meant that a developer on one team didn’t need to know anything about how another team operated in order to integrate the product it made—he or she could follow the documentation and use that product as though it were an external service. Ultimately, this ease of cooperation became extremely efficient and is what paved the way for  Amazon Web Services—a $6.7 billion business that powers huge parts of the web (including Netflix).

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DNS settings remain set after TAP use #180

case "disconnect":
    // Delete direct route for the VPN gateway
    echo("Deleting Direct Route for VPN Gateway");
    exec("route delete " + env("VPNGATEWAY") + " mask 255.255.255.255");
    exec("netsh interface ip set dns " + env("TUNIDX") + " source=static 8.8.8.8")
    exec("netsh interface ip delete dns " + env("TUNIDX") + " 8.8.8.8")
https://github.com/openconnect/openconnect-gui/issues/180 Use above code for use with Openconnect 1.5.3

Why Software is the Ultimate Business Model (and the data to prove it)

I often say that if Warren Buffett were 30 years old, he’d only invest in software. Here’s why…

1. The Demand for Software is very strong and stable — Spend on software has grown at ~9% for about a decade. Looking forward Gartner estimates show that the Software category is expected to grow 8–11% versus the U.S. economy at 2–3% and broader technology spending at 3–4%. Software is a GOOD neighborhood to live in.

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Coding Tip: Try to Code Without Loops

source: https://edgecoders.com/coding-tip-try-to-code-without-loops-18694cf06428

You might uncover better solutions

In a previous article, I wrote about how trying to solve coding challenges without using if-statements might help uncover better solutions. In this article, we will explore how to solve some more challenges, but this time without using any loops.

By loops, I mean imperative loops like for, for...in, for...of, while, and do...while. All of these are similar in the way that they provide an imperative way to perform iterations. The alternative is to perform iterations in a declarative way. Continue reading “Coding Tip: Try to Code Without Loops”