The Plato-infused philosophy of “The Matrix” still feels timely 20 years later

Incredible as it may seem, the end of March marks 20 years since the release of the first film in the Matrix franchise directed by the Wachowski siblings. This “cyberpunk” sci-fi movie was a box office hit with its dystopian futuristic vision, distinctive fashion sense, and slick, innovative action sequences. But it was also a catalyst for popular discussion around some very big philosophical themes.

The film centers on a computer hacker, “Neo” (played by Keanu Reeves), who learns that his whole life has been lived within an elaborate, simulated reality. This computer-generated dream world was designed by an artificial intelligence of human creation, which industrially farms human bodies for energy while distracting them via a relatively pleasant parallel reality called the “matrix.”

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First Mover Disadvantage

Source: https://avc.com/2018/08/first-mover-disadvantage/?utm_source=wanqu.co&utm_campaign=Wanqu+Daily&utm_medium=website

Getting to something first has tremendous advantages but also comes with a bunch of challenges.

I was thinking about this yesterday as I was setting up a couple iPads to be used around our house as smart home controllers.

The Apple identity management and app store systems feel like they were built for a different era. Because they were.

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What are the most popular strategies used in high-frequency trading?

Pair Trading – Trade two stocks which naturally track each other an example could be Coke and Pepsi, make money when they fall out of line on the idea that they will have to revert back to tracking each other. This is a common mean revision strategy used by hedge funds and might not exactly fit high-frequency trading however it still fall under algorithmic trading.

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Run Powershell scheduled task without pop up

I found this solution a while back by calling the PowerShell Script via a .VBS script. Not ideal but, it negates the window flash:

command = "powershell.exe -nologo -command C:\Scripts\YourScript.ps1"  
set shell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
shell.Run command,0

Schedule this .VBS in the task scheduler and it will call your script the same as before.

How do you turn around the culture of a 130,000-person company? Ask Satya Nadella

It was March 27, 2014, and Satya Nadella was about to make his first public appearance as CEO of Microsoft. The tone, he knew, would be important.

Nadella’s predecessor, Steve Ballmer, was famous for making public appearances feel epic. At a 1991 meeting in Japan, he seemed to injure his vocal chords because he was screaming “Windows” with such force. In 2000, when Microsoft celebrated its 25th anniversary, Ballmer reportedly popped out of a giant cake. And in 2013, when he announced he was stepping down, he bid farewell to 13,000 Microsoft employees as “(I’ve had) The Time of My Life” blared through the speakers of Key Arena in Seattle. Through tears, the 6’5” Ballmer shouted, “Soak it in all of you. You work for the greatest company in the world.”

Nadella was not that kind of CEO.

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“The Linux of social media”—How LiveJournal pioneered (then lost) blogging

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/the-linux-of-social-media-how-livejournal-pioneered-then-lost-web-blogging/?utm_source=wanqu.co&utm_campaign=Wanqu+Daily&utm_medium=website

George RR Martin’s platform switch reminds us of an early blogging giant greatly changed.

Last April, famed writer and hero-murderer George R.R. Martin announced that he was hoisting his ancient blog from his moldering LiveJournal onto his personal website. For casual Game of Thrones fans, it was a minor hiccup at best—most clicked the new link and never looked back. For a certain strata of enthusiasts, however, this was a far more momentous move. Described as “the last holdout” by longtime LiveJournal volunteer-turned-employee Janine Costanzo, Martin’s blog was perhaps the once-blogging-giant’s last bond to the world of great pop culture. So while the author may never finish his most beloved literary series, his simple act of Web hosting logistics truly marks the end of an era.

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First Kaggle Competition Experience

https://hackernoon.com/first-kaggle-competition-experience-591fbbc751a0

A write-up of my first kaggle competition experience

During my Initial planning on My Self-Taught Machine Learning journey this year, I had pledged to make into Top 25% for any 2 (Live) Kaggle competitions.

This is a write up of how Team “rm-rf /” made it to the Top 30% in our First kaggle competition ever: The “Quick, Draw! Doodle Recognition Challenge” by Google AI Team, hosted on kaggle.

Special Mention: Team “rm-rf /” was a two-member team consisting of my Business partner and friend Rishi Bhalodia and myself.

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Time Complexity of building a Suffix Tree

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7451942/time-complexity-of-building-a-suffix-tree

Your intuition behind why the algorithm should be Θ(n2) is a good one, but most suffix trees are designed in a way that eliminates the need for this time complexity. Intuitively, it would seem that you need Θ(n2) different nodes to hold all of the different suffixes, because you’d need n + (n – 1) + … + 1 different nodes. However, suffix trees are typically designed so that there isn’t a single node per character in the suffix. Instead, each edge is typically labeled with a sequence of characters that are substrings of the original string. It still may seem that you’d need Θ(n2) time to construct this tree because you’d have to copy the substrings over to these edges, but typically this is avoided by a cute trick – since all the edges are labeled with strings that are substrings of the input, the edges can instead be labeled with a start and end position, meaning that an edge spanning Θ(n) characters can be constructed in O(1) time and using O(1) space.

That said, constructing suffix trees is still really hard to do. The Θ(n) algorithms referenced in Wikipedia aren’t easy. One of the first algorithms found to work in linear time is Ukkonen’s Algorithm, which is commonly described in textbooks on string algorithms (such as Algorithms on Strings, Trees, and Sequences). The original paper is linked in Wikipedia. More modern approaches work by first building a suffix array and using that to then construct the suffix tree.

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-1/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-2/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-3/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-4/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-5/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/ukkonens-suffix-tree-construction-part-6/

http://wuyuansheng.brinkster.net/doc/Suffix-Trees.pdf

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9452701/ukkonens-suffix-tree-algorithm-in-plain-english/9513423#9513423