Mark Cuban Failed Several Times Times Before Hitting It Big

https://www.celebritynetworth.com/articles/billionaire-news/mark-cuban-failed-several-times-times-before-hitting-it-big/

It just takes one good idea to make it big, but sometimes that good idea takes longer to come along. Just ask Mark Cuban. Sure, today we all know him as a billionaire entrepreneur, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, and a shark on Shark Tank, but a bit over three decades ago, he was over 30 and coming off a string of failures in business. On a recent interview with Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast, he put this in perspective, saying: “It doesn’t matter how many times we f— up. You only gotta be right once. Then everyone tells you how lucky you are.”

He’s right. In his case, people only focus on his successes: selling his start-up software business MicroSolutions in 1990 to CompuServe for $6 million, selling Broadcast.com in 1999 to Yahoo! for $5.7 billion in stock (officially making him a billionaire for the first time), and predicting the dot-com bust and selling off his Yahoo! stock before the value of it tanked. But Cuban failed at a number of ventures before his string of successes made him a wealthy man.

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為什麼老實人賺不到錢,富人這樣解釋

http://www.thevalue101.com/article.php?id=46042

古往今來“老實”似乎被傳統文化看成是一種美德,老實人是好人,老實人是善人,老實人做事踏實可靠,老實人城市善良,老實人有很多的優點,但是不知道從什麼時候開始,“老實”一詞帶有一些貶義的色彩了,尤其是“老實”和“錢”放在一起的時候,“老實”就變成了呆板,辦事機動性不強。然而現實生活中的“老實人”偏偏過得不是很好。

其實現實真的很殘酷,很多人都在爭取更好的生活,從而更加努力,但真正能成功,能夠賺到大錢的人,永遠是少數,絕大多數人都在無力的掙扎。如果你對這些正在努力的人有所關注,或者你是他們中的一員,你會發現這些人通常有一個共同點,那就是他們太老實了,而且越老實的人賺錢越難,兩者是成正比的,這是為什麼呢?為什麼老實的人就越是賺不到錢呢?有錢人又是怎麼賺到錢的呢?

讓我們先看看為什麼老實的人賺的錢少,或者說為什麼老實人賺錢難?

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This Time, Can We Finally Turn a Financial Crisis Into an Opportunity?

Once again, markets are crashing and taxpayers are bailing out wealthy insiders. It’s time we reform this perverse social contract.

At a time of coronavirus-induced panic in the financial markets, there are two wrong ideas about supporting the economy in a downturn that still haunt us. One possible upside of the current crisis is that these two ideas may finally be buried for good. And when they are, we might use this rare moment of clarity to fundamentally rethink who these markets, and their perennial bailouts, benefit in the first place.

The first of these ideas is that investors, when they decide to buy or sell their assets, are responding rationally to information. That is, markets are “efficient,” and therefore the best way to organize how a society chooses to invest. This idea is challenged by what we have seen in the financial markets over the past two weeks. Panicking investors are responding to uncertainty, not information. Central banks around the world have rightly intervened to try to stabilize markets that have been anything but efficient.

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Want to be successful? Be inconsistent

https://joel.is/want-to-be-successful-be-inconsistent/?utm_source=wanqu.co&utm_campaign=Wanqu+Daily&utm_medium=website

Recently 37signals published an article titled Some advice from Jeff Bezos. This wasn’t your usual advice, and I found it interesting to read and how familiar it felt as I read each next line. The post was all about “changing your mind”. The way I would describe the overall theme, is “inconsistency”. Here’s the key part of the post, paraphrased:

People who are right a lot of the time, are people who often change their mind. Consistency of thought is not a particularly positive trait.

I find this fascinating, because one of the biggest challenges I’ve found as a founder for the last few years is the times when I change my mind, when have a realisation and I become inconsistent on a thought I previously had. This is amplified as your startup grows, because you have users, co-workers and stakeholders who you are in touch with who are there to witness and be affected by your inconsistency.

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To neutralise populism, give people more control

Robin Varghese and Sarah Pray in The Economist:

Robin Varghese

People who have lost their jobs lose not only an income but also a sense of place, of purpose and of solidarity. Community dislocation, absence of social belonging, loss of identity, lack of political control and self-determination—these things are extremely hard to measure in dollars and cents or pounds and pence.

Responding to this is urgent. Unless people get a more substantial voice and sense of agency over their lives, it is hard to see how the backlash against global trade can be quelled, and that threatens the global economy and democratic institutions.

So how might confidence and agency be restored to those facing the sharp end of globalisation? Our work at the Open Society Foundations (OSF) sheds light on how giving people a “path to participation” can help tamp the anxiety that drives people to embrace protectionism and populism. We have looked specifically at three contentious areas: refugee settlement, worker participation and trade policy.

More here.

An Animated Look at the Charade of the Global Elites: Claiming They Want to “Change the World,” They End Up Preserving the Unjust Status Quo

http://www.openculture.com/2020/01/an-animated-look-at-the-charade-of-the-global-elites.html

From Peter Kropotkin to Leo Tolstoy to Noam Chomsky, some of the most revered anarchist thinkers have exhausted page after page explaining why power over others is unjustified, no matter how it justifies itself. To those who say the wealthy and powerful benefit society with charitable works and occasionally humane policy, Tolstoy might reply with the following illustration, which opens Time editor Anand Giridharadas’ talk above, “Winner Take All,” as animated by the RSA:

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Elon Musk Owes His Success to This Accelerated Learning Process Used by Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla

https://www.inc.com/business-insider/elon-musk-owes-his-success-to-this-3-step-problem-solving-process.html?cid=sf01002

By the age of 46, the man has built three multi-billion dollar companies, and this is his secret.

  • It’s easy to link Elon Musk’s rapid success, ability to solve unsolvable problems, and genius-level creativity to his incredible work ethic.
  • But during a one-on-one interview with TED curator Chris Anderson, Musk attributed to his genius-level creativity and success to a method of reasoning called first principles.
  • First-principles thinking works like this: First, you identify and define your assumptions; then, you break down the problem into its fundamental principles; and, lastly, you create new solutions from scratch.

By the age of 46, Elon Musk has innovated and built three revolutionary multibillion-dollar companies in different fields — Paypal (financial services), Tesla (automotive), and SpaceX (aerospace).

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“Decency quotient”: How this CEO frames inclusive capitalism for his company

https://www.fastcompany.com/90424514/decency-quotient-how-this-ceo-frames-inclusive-capitalism-for-his-company

Mastercard CEO Ajay Banga says “DQ” is as important as IQ or EQ.

A few years ago, Ajay Banga, president and CEO of Mastercard, was searching for a concise way to describe his approach to community outreach and other social impact initiatives. Employees, he says, were constantly asking him what criteria he applied when, say, deciding to send supplies and volunteers in the wake of the hurricanes in Houston and Puerto Rico. At one town hall he blurted out the term “DQ,” short for “decency quotient.” The term stuck.

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Cracking the Code of Sustained Collaboration

https://hbr.org/2019/11/cracking-the-code-of-sustained-collaboration

Ask any leader whether his or her organization values collaboration, and you’ll get a resounding yes. Ask whether the firm’s strategies to increase collaboration have been successful, and you’ll probably receive a different answer.

“No change seems to stick or to produce what we expected,” an executive at a large pharmaceutical company recently told me. Most of the dozens of leaders I’ve interviewed on the subject report similar feelings of frustration: So much hope and effort, so little to show for it.

One problem is that leaders think about collaboration too narrowly: as a value to cultivate but not a skill to teach. Businesses have tried increasing it through various methods, from open offices to naming it an official corporate goal. While many of these approaches yield progress—mainly by creating opportunities for collaboration or demonstrating institutional support for it—they all try to influence employees through superficial or heavy-handed means, and research has shown that none of them reliably delivers truly robust collaboration.

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海纳百商

MV《海纳百商》你会单曲循环吗?

一曲《海纳百商》太有范儿了!你的耳机,准备好了吗?#上海进博会

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