“Decency quotient”: How this CEO frames inclusive capitalism for his company

https://www.fastcompany.com/90424514/decency-quotient-how-this-ceo-frames-inclusive-capitalism-for-his-company

Mastercard CEO Ajay Banga says “DQ” is as important as IQ or EQ.

A few years ago, Ajay Banga, president and CEO of Mastercard, was searching for a concise way to describe his approach to community outreach and other social impact initiatives. Employees, he says, were constantly asking him what criteria he applied when, say, deciding to send supplies and volunteers in the wake of the hurricanes in Houston and Puerto Rico. At one town hall he blurted out the term “DQ,” short for “decency quotient.” The term stuck.

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Cracking the Code of Sustained Collaboration

https://hbr.org/2019/11/cracking-the-code-of-sustained-collaboration

Ask any leader whether his or her organization values collaboration, and you’ll get a resounding yes. Ask whether the firm’s strategies to increase collaboration have been successful, and you’ll probably receive a different answer.

“No change seems to stick or to produce what we expected,” an executive at a large pharmaceutical company recently told me. Most of the dozens of leaders I’ve interviewed on the subject report similar feelings of frustration: So much hope and effort, so little to show for it.

One problem is that leaders think about collaboration too narrowly: as a value to cultivate but not a skill to teach. Businesses have tried increasing it through various methods, from open offices to naming it an official corporate goal. While many of these approaches yield progress—mainly by creating opportunities for collaboration or demonstrating institutional support for it—they all try to influence employees through superficial or heavy-handed means, and research has shown that none of them reliably delivers truly robust collaboration.

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海纳百商

MV《海纳百商》你会单曲循环吗?

一曲《海纳百商》太有范儿了!你的耳机,准备好了吗?#上海进博会

春去秋來 日月相煥
黃埔江上 波浪婉轉
朗朗秋風 笑迎賓客
365個日夜 玉蘭城中又相見
這一切就像昨天 還在眼前
同樣的追求 讓我們相約每一年
貿易自由化來到新的紀元
十一月上海 再次光芒無限
擁抱科技之光 引領時代改變
握緊合作之手 方能一路向前
未來生活 在這裡一應俱全
彙聚世界目光 用精彩書寫經典
中國創辦 世界共享
互惠互利攜手一起發展
世界精彩 奪目綻放
全球首發打開你的視野

Diversity and inclusion are a necessity, not a nicety

https://www.ericsson.com/en/blog/2019/10/diversity-and-inclusion-are-a-necessity-not-a-nicety?utm_source=LinkedIn&utm_medium=social_organic&utm_campaign=TeamEricsson&utm_content=d6dde679-b1ec-4ff2-832b-f7fe8d7664d3

Diversity is multifaceted in my view. It includes gender, age, cultural background, knowledge and skillset. Diversity is about having different ideas, perspectives and approaches. However, diversity is only the first step and will not on its own provide results. Inclusion is where the magic starts to happen.

Diversity and inclusion are important to me. It is on a personal and professional level.

I am a father of three kids, two girls and a boy. I want them to grow up in a world and society where there is not only equal opportunity regardless of background or gender, but that diversity is valued and strived for. I was born in Iran and raised in Sweden. For many years I struggled in Sweden with my identity and to try to fit in. I tried to be like everyone else. Over time I have come to appreciate the perspective that my original culture has given me. Being born in one country, raised in another, and travelling the world has allowed me to understand the importance of perspectives — the more diverse, the better.

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Why we will end up piercing the corporate veil

https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2019/09/why-we-will-end-up-piercing-the-corporate-veil.html

The internet is one big reason why we will find it increasingly difficult to separate out the assets of a company from the assets of its founders or CEOs, as I discuss in my latest Bloomberg column:

More important, social media personalizes agency — in effect, making it easier to accuse particular individuals of wrongdoing. Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, and the Koch brothers all have images or iconic photos that can be put into a social media post, amplifying any attack on their respective companies. It is harder to vilify Exxon, in part because hardly anyone can name its CEO (Darren Woods, since 2017), who in any case did not create the current version of the company. Putting the Exxon logo on your vituperative social media post just doesn’t have the same impact. With Bill Gates having stepped down as Microsoft CEO in 2000, it is harder to vilify that company as well.

This personalization of corporate evil has become a bigger issue in part because many prominent tech companies are currently led by their founders, and also because the number of publicly traded companies has been falling, which means there are fewer truly anonymous corporations. It’s not hard to imagine a future in which the most important decision a new company makes is how personalized it wants to be. A well-known founder can spark interest in the company and its products, and help to attract talent. At the same time, a personalized company is potentially a much greater target.

The more human identities and feelings are part of the equation, however, the harder it will be to keep the classic distinction between a corporation and its owners. As the era of personalization evolves, it will inevitably engulf that most impersonal of entities — the corporation.

Do read the whole thing. https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-09-16/purdue-pharma-bankruptcy-how-much-will-the-sackler-family-pay

The man who gave us brainstorming meetings did his best thinking alone

https://qz.com/work/1675944/the-man-who-invented-brainstorming-did-his-creative-thinking-alone/

Some companies have a serious addiction to brainstorming. Whenever a problem arises, the team is called to gather and shout out possible solutions, with at least one notetaker scrambling to get everything down. It’s as if this were the only known way out of a pickle, or into a new project—and it can feel like a supreme waste of time, especially when the same few dominating personalities ruin the mood.

Yet the value of brainstorming is rarely questioned. (A notable exception is a 2012 New Yorker story arguing that research cannot scientifically validate the effectiveness of the process, but even that did little to get in the way of the ubiquity of brainstorming.) Perhaps that’s because the idea of brainstorming seemingly has always existed; it’s as much a part of workplace culture as pizza parties or sales reports.

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Why you should never tell the boss you have food poisoning

by Sarah Todd via Quartz

Whenever I have to stay home sick from work, I’m always uncertain about how much detail to give. Do I let my boss know that I have the stomach flu, specifically? Or would she prefer the simple elegance of “feeling under the weather?”

I mentioned this conundrum at a recent dinner with three friends, all of whom are managers. For the most part, they agreed they would not want to know the particulars of an employee’s reasons for missing work. They trust the people they manage and are troubled by the idea that workers would feel pressured to disclose the minutiae of their bodily ailments. The exception, they said, is when an employee has a chronic illness or condition, in which case it’s helpful to have a bit of context for regular absences.

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你可能不知道的咖啡价值链

http://www.ftchinese.com/story/001083133?full=y&ccode=2G192004&exclusive

咖啡为什么这么贵?为什么咖啡种植者会在咖啡日益流行的时候陷入困境?谁拿走了咖啡价值链中最大的利润?

考虑到消费者喝的咖啡比以往任何时候都要多,当下应该是种植者的好年景。然而,由于领先生产国巴西的咖啡豆大量涌入市场,阿拉比卡咖啡豆(两种主要咖啡豆中的一种,品质较高,口感较为柔和)在纽约洲际交易所(ICE)的价格仅略高于1美元/磅,远低于五年前价格的一半。

What Buddhism Taught Me About Product Management

https://medium.com/swlh/what-buddhism-taught-me-about-product-management-f05c7486649c

Taken at one of my all-time favorite Airbnb’s in Joshua Tree

The Buddha would have made an excellent product manager 🤩. He was obsessed with solving people’s problems, he summarized his ideas into handy lists, and he developed simple frameworks for achieving his vision. He was also one of the earliest practitioners of working from first principles, famously sitting under a Bodhi tree for forty nine days straight in order to “see things as they truly were.” 🧘‍♂️

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