Diversity and inclusion are a necessity, not a nicety

https://www.ericsson.com/en/blog/2019/10/diversity-and-inclusion-are-a-necessity-not-a-nicety?utm_source=LinkedIn&utm_medium=social_organic&utm_campaign=TeamEricsson&utm_content=d6dde679-b1ec-4ff2-832b-f7fe8d7664d3

Diversity is multifaceted in my view. It includes gender, age, cultural background, knowledge and skillset. Diversity is about having different ideas, perspectives and approaches. However, diversity is only the first step and will not on its own provide results. Inclusion is where the magic starts to happen.

Diversity and inclusion are important to me. It is on a personal and professional level.

I am a father of three kids, two girls and a boy. I want them to grow up in a world and society where there is not only equal opportunity regardless of background or gender, but that diversity is valued and strived for. I was born in Iran and raised in Sweden. For many years I struggled in Sweden with my identity and to try to fit in. I tried to be like everyone else. Over time I have come to appreciate the perspective that my original culture has given me. Being born in one country, raised in another, and travelling the world has allowed me to understand the importance of perspectives — the more diverse, the better.

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How Democracy Made Us Dumb

http://www.unz.com/imercer/how-democracy-made-us-dumb/

From the riffs of outrage coming from the Democrats and their demos over “our democracy” betrayed, infiltrated even destroyed—you’d never know that a rich vein of thinking in opposition to democracy runs through Western intellectual thought, and that those familiar with it would be tempted to say “good riddance.”

Voicing opposition to democracy is just not done in politically polite circles, conservative and liberal alike.

For this reason, the Mises Institute’s Circle in Seattle, an annual gathering, represented a break from the pack.

The Mises Institute is the foremost think tank working to advance free-market economics from the perspective of the Austrian School of Economics. It is devoted to peace, prosperity, and private property, implicit in which is the demotion of raw democracy, the state, and its welfare-warfare machine.

This year, amid presentations that explained “Why American Democracy Fails,” it fell to me to speak to “How Democracy Made Us Dumb.” (Oh yes! Reality on the ground was not candy-coated.)

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Singapore’s Lee Hsien Loong a social media hero in China for Hong Kong protest comments

A video of Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong saying his country would be “finished” if it were hit by Hong Kong-style protests has gone viral in mainland China, prompting social media users to praise the Lion City’s strong governance.

Lee had told a union event on Tuesday that populist movements were growing in various places across the world – from the United States and France to Hong Kong, where anti-government protests have entered their 19th week – and he refused to dismiss the possibility of similar divisions appearing in his own country.

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LeBron criticizing Morey

LeBron criticizing Morey for his China comments:”At times there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you’re not thinking about others — when you only think about yourself. […] I believe he wasn’t educated on the issue at harm. […] Be careful what you say and tweet.”

There are two types of happiness—and we’re chasing the wrong one

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/eleven-habits-supremely-happy-people-dr-travis-bradberry/

We’re always chasing something—be it a promotion, a new car, or a significant other. This leads to the belief that, “When (blank) happens, I’ll finally be happy.”

While these major events do make us happy at first, research shows this happiness doesn’t last. A study from Northwestern University measured the happiness levels of regular people against those who had won large lottery prizes the year prior. The researchers were surprised to discover that the happiness ratings of both groups were practically identical.

The mistaken notion that major life events dictate your happiness and sadness is so prevalent that psychologists have a name for it: impact bias. The reality is, event-based happiness is fleeting.

Happiness is synthetic—you either create it, or you don’t. Happiness that lasts is earned through your habits. Supremely happy people have honed habits that maintain their happiness day in, day out. Try out their habits, and see what they do for you:

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