Why we like what we like: A scientist’s surprising findings

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/08/why-we-like-what-we-like-a-scientists-surprising-findings/

Your genes, your germs, and your environment all may influence your tastes in food—as well as partners and politics.

There may be nothing more self-defining than our tastes. Whether in food, wine, romantic partners, or political candidates, our tastes represent our identity. So it made sense to me that my likes and dislikes were formed through careful deliberation and rational decision-making—that is, through choices where I wielded some control.

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The man who gave us brainstorming meetings did his best thinking alone

https://qz.com/work/1675944/the-man-who-invented-brainstorming-did-his-creative-thinking-alone/

Some companies have a serious addiction to brainstorming. Whenever a problem arises, the team is called to gather and shout out possible solutions, with at least one notetaker scrambling to get everything down. It’s as if this were the only known way out of a pickle, or into a new project—and it can feel like a supreme waste of time, especially when the same few dominating personalities ruin the mood.

Yet the value of brainstorming is rarely questioned. (A notable exception is a 2012 New Yorker story arguing that research cannot scientifically validate the effectiveness of the process, but even that did little to get in the way of the ubiquity of brainstorming.) Perhaps that’s because the idea of brainstorming seemingly has always existed; it’s as much a part of workplace culture as pizza parties or sales reports.

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What Are the Best Omega-3 Foods?

Here’s a list of the top 15 omega-3 foods (percentages based on 4,000 milligrams per day of total omega-3s):

  1. Mackerel: 6,982 milligrams in 1 cup cooked (174 precent DV) 
  2. Salmon Fish Oil: 4,767 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (119 percent DV) 
  3. Cod Liver Oil: 2.664 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (66 percent DV) 
  4. Walnuts: 2,664 milligrams in 1/4 cup (66 percent DV) 
  5. Chia Seeds: 2,457 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (61 percent DV) 
  6. Herring: 1,885 milligrams in 3 ounces (47 percent DV) 
  7. Salmon (wild-caught): 1,716 milligrams in 3 ounces (42 percent DV) 
  8. Flaxseeds (ground): 1,597 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (39 percent DV) 
  9. Tuna: 1,414 milligrams in 3 ounces (35 percent DV) 
  10. White Fish: 1,363 milligrams in 3 ounces (34 percent DV) 
  11. Sardines: 1,363 milligrams in 1 can/3.75 ounces (34 percent DV) 
  12. Hemp Seeds: 1,000 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (25 percent DV) 
  13. Anchovies: 951 milligrams in 1 can/2 ounces (23 percent DV) 
  14. Natto: 428 milligrams in 1/4 cup (10 percent DV) 
  15. Egg Yolks: 240 milligrams in 1/2 cup (6 percent DV)

Consent Matters: When Tech Takes Remote Control Without Your Permission

https://puri.sm/posts/consent-matters-when-tech-takes-remote-control-without-your-permission/

In my previous post I talked about why consent matters when it comes to privacy; and yet, privacy is only one of the areas where tech companies take advantage of users without their consent. Recently, tech companies have come to a troubling consensus: that they can change your computer, remotely (and often silently) without your knowledge or permission.

Some examples of this include:

Below you will find the origins of this mentality, the risks and harm that arise from it, and what it says about who really owns a computer.

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Why do abusive men (and the women who support them) behave the way they do?

https://qz.com/india/1669110/metoo-india-gave-me-the-courage-to-talk-about-domestic-violence/

New Delhi, 1990. I am 16, seated in the living room of my paternal grandfather’s home, reading a newspaper. My grandfather pushes open the mesh door and walks in with a package in hand.

“You have got a parcel from your mother,” he said, in an oddly accusatory tone. “Yes, it’s a book of recipes,” I replied. “I’m trying to learn how to cook.”

“You should focus on your studies. Leave the cooking to women. I am sending it to Kuku,” he said, referring to my father’s sister by her nickname.

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The PGP Problem

https://latacora.micro.blog/2019/07/16/the-pgp-problem.html

Cryptography engineers have been tearing their hair out over PGP’s deficiencies for (literally) decades. When other kinds of engineers get wind of this, they’re shocked. PGP is bad? Why do people keep telling me to use PGP? The answer is that they shouldn’t be telling you that, because PGP is bad and needs to go away.

There are, as you’re about to see, lots of problems with PGP. Fortunately, if you’re not morbidly curious, there’s a simple meta-problem with it: it was designed in the 1990s, before serious modern cryptography. No competent crypto engineer would design a system that looked like PGP today, nor tolerate most of its defects in any other design. Serious cryptographers have largely given up on PGP and don’t spend much time publishing on it anymore (with a notable exception). Well-understood problems in PGP have gone unaddressed for over a decade because of this.

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HBO’s Invisible Stories on life in Singapore’s public housing shows the city beneath the glitter

https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/entertainment/article/3018338/hbos-invisible-stories-life-singapores-public-housing-shows

  • Far from the excessive wealth of Singapore’s crazy rich citizens, Invisible Stories shines a light on the lives of how most people in the Lion City live
  • Series creator Ler Jiyuan says it is neither very dramatic nor sensational, with each episode a character study that brings out the life of ordinary people
HBO’s Invisible Stories cast and crew (from left) producer Ler Jiyuan, actress Yeo Yann Yann and actor Devin Pan.

HBO’s Invisible Stories cast and crew (from left) producer Ler Jiyuan, actress Yeo Yann Yann and actor Devin Pan.

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